Video Games, not just for Kids


So, today was one of those days where I had a few different topics that I wanted to write about. I had a request to write about video games. I’ve written one or two blogs about video games in the past. However, I think that there’s always more to be said about them.

I think it’s fair to say that video games are a bit of the red headed step child in the entertainment industry. They aren’t taken as seriously as movies and it’s not as culturally acceptable to geek out over video games as it is to geek out over movies (some movies) or television shows. However, I think that this is going to change and it’s not because of the video game designers and publishers.

I think that Twitch is going to drive to make video games more acceptable and shift video games location in culture. Through events like Intel’s championship series or DreamHack which is a collection of tournaments for games like DOTA 2, League of Legends, Star Craft, and many more, I believe that there is an opportunity for video games to reach an acceptance level akin to golf. For the most part these games are multiplayer and very team based. There are leagues, trading of players and everything else you would expect in a major league “sport.”

It’s not just these events, it’s the personalities that drive watching live streaming. As I’ve mentioned in the past I have a few friends that stream and there is a community that has sprung up around watching these guys play. It’s pretty awesome.

Through these streamers, I’ve been able to experience many more interesting games than I can actually play or even afford to play. This allows me to keep abreast of the video game landscape without having to really play (I play Civ V, Binding of Isaac, Super Meat Boy mostly). In the case where the streamers are playing single player games it’s similar to watching a movie with someone guiding the movie. It’s a lot of fun, especially since you’re able to have a conversation with the star and his fans all at the same time.

Furthermore, I think that video games have not been given enough credit for pushing the boundaries of technology. Game designers and players for PC together drive companies like Intel, AMD, and Nvidia to keep designing newer and more powerful products. Intel is able to make a massive profit on their platforms designed for gaming – they know it, they’ve changed their strategy a few times in regard to selling stand alone chips because of gamer’s demands. We should be praising the hardcore gamer because they are helping us continue to advance in one of the few bright spots in our economy.

Each video game community has it’s own quirks and idiosyncrasies, which can be seen in how new games are developed as well as in business practices for the developer. For example, Valve has several economists studying the naturally occurring economy around trading in games like TF2, I believe that through controlled economic settings like TF2 where there is no central control (Blizzard I’m looking at you!) unique economic conditions can emerge that will shape how the designers develop future releases in the game. This has been clearly shown in how Valve continually releases new hats (yes, hats).

Compared to Eve (a massive multiplayer online role playing space video game) TF2’s economic system is rudementary. In Eve you can buy, build, trade and develop true economic systems. Furthermore, it’s possible to see the effect of war and diplomatic missteps on the economy. Recently nearly $200k worth of money was wiped out because someone missed a monthly payment. It’s possible to see how various factions have recovered after a serious economic, material, and military shock hit the entire game.

Games are vital to our culture. We’ve always had both physical (sports) and mental (chess) games. I believe that video games are simply a new extension to both of those. Many games require you to think quickly and have quick moving fingers (Star Craft) while others are almost as passive as watching TV. Understanding the value of video games and the culture about them is important to understand how our culture can grow and develop in new ways.

3 thoughts on “Video Games, not just for Kids

  1. Wow, this was great. I really like how you mention that videogames as part of a culture because it’s so true. Even though they get attacked for being violent, or waste of time. As an aspiring game designer it’s offensive to think they’re less of an art form, or entertainment. I think like you said it is a time issue. Writing started as a method to keep track of inventory, and films didn’t even have sound when they started to made. Video games are in their still infancy. I recommend people watch Jane mcgonigal’s Ted talk about gaming. I also hope people check out the trailer for “valiant heroes: the Great War” I don’t think the gameplay is up to snuff but the atmosphere and story are where I want more games to head. Gives me chills thinking about it, lol. Thanks for using my recommendation. Great blog post as always.

    • Thanks, I really appreciate your feedback! I do believe I’ve watched that TED talk, good stuff. One of the games that sticks out in my mind is Walking Dead, didn’t play it, but the graphics weren’t amazing and not all the game play itself was great, but my god that story was phenomenal. Got hit by a feels train. I think that the combination of interaction with amazing story is vital to a good game.

      best of luck learning to develop games. I hope your looking into Unity, some of the guys from KBMOD are learning how to develop in it and I’m planning on doing the same.

  2. Pingback: Starting from the Bottom, building an app | Science, Technology, + Culture

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